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Spanish Wine - Sherry
Let it first be said that Sherry only comes from one place in the world— the Jerez region of Southwestern Spain. This is the most important thing about Sherry. The second most important fact is that it's out of fashion, underappreciated, and seriously undervalued.

Spanish Wine - Sherry
The name Sherry is thought to be the English corruption of the region where this fortified wine is made—Jerez.

Spanish Wine - Sherry
Sherry is made from three white grape varieties—Palomino, Pedro Ximénez, and Moscatel. Sherry can be made from just one of these varieties, but they're usually blended for balance and complexity.

Spanish Wine - Sherry
All Sherry is either Fino or Oloroso, or a descendent of these two types.

Spanish Wine - Sherry
Fino Sherry is generally bone dry. Its distinctive bread-like character comes from a yeast film called flor that develops on the wine's surface as it is being made. The flor protects the Fino from oxidizing and keeps it delicate and fresh.

Spanish Wine - Sherry
Tío Pepe by González Byass is a classic example of a Fino—bone dry and very neutral with a slightly salty tang and hints of fresh bread. Not a fruity drink.

Spanish Wine - Sherry
An Amontillado Sherry is a Fino that has lost its flor and has thus become amber and oxidized, which is intentional of course. True Amontillados are bone dry, but some producers sweeten them—read the back label to be sure of sugar levels.

Spanish Wine - Sherry
Hidalgo makes an excellent Amontillado called Napoleon Seco that's all coffee, toffee, and nuts.

Spanish Wine - Sherry
Manzanilla is dry Fino Sherry made in the seaside Spanish town of Sanlucar de Barrameda in Jerez. It tastes a bit salty, which has nothing to do with the fact that it's by the sea, but this is a handy way to remember the style.

Spanish Wine - Sherry
Oloroso Sherries are dark brown, rich wines that have not been affected by a layer of flor yeast. As a result, they don't show that yeasty, bread-like character of Fino Sherry. Olorosos are fortified to 18 percent alcohol and they gain concentration as they age in cask.Traditional Oloroso Sherries are bone dry but today many producers sweeten them.

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